09
Nov
13

The Little Rubber Ball

2

Once upon a time there was a little rubber ball that lived in a broken box with sharp jagged edges. Every time the little ball bounced, it got bruised, but that didn’t stop it from bouncing because that’s what rubber balls do.

One day the little ball bounced so high that it bounced right out of the box and into a strong new box with a lid. The ball was happy.

It grew stronger and stronger everyday until one day it grew so strong that it jumped right out of the box-with-the-lid and bounced away.

It bounced on the land and it bounced in the sea.

It bounced higher and higher, and higher, until one day it bounced right up into the sky and landed among the stars.

When it looked down, it saw boxes, millions of boxes – some with lids, some without, some broken, some fixed. It looked down and sighed, a long deep sigh, realizing that boxes were not made to bounce.


4 Responses to “The Little Rubber Ball”


  1. November 11, 2013 at 2:40 am

    Uauuuuuu! It’s a very interesting story! and really it’s true. Sometimes we have to move away to realizing about the sense of our life. 😉

    Like

  2. 2 selmatufail
    November 11, 2013 at 11:50 pm

    Thank you, Eduardo, I think (hope) that the more one travels, the broader one’s field of vision becomes.
    The boxes represent the way humans organize and compartmentalize their understanding of life in different communities – but life doesn’t really follow such organizations…

    Like

  3. December 7, 2013 at 8:56 am

    i really enjoyed this short story. I am working with kindergardeners and elementary school, and I know they love it. i can see this as one of the stories i would read to them. thanks for sharing.

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


Blogs I Follow: Tillism.com

Follow Selma Tufail on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 181 other followers


African dress codes

About African culture

%d bloggers like this: